Iceland – a country with more rainbows than people [2]

/ October 17, 2014/ Europe, Iceland, Travel Journal/ 1 comments

Welcome back!

I hope you enjoyed my last article. Here is the continuation of my journey. This time I am going to take you to the south of Iceland.

 

On the Ring Road

Following our Reykjavik host’s advice, we started the further journey with Kleifarvatn – another huge lake, the biggest one on the Reykjanes peninsula. However, we were invited for a short stroll in the suburbs of Reykjavik and for an Icelandic breakfast before that. How did it happened? At the Berlin airport, while worrying that my plane would be cancelled due to volcanic eruptions I met a nice woman who runs a tour company near Reykjavik. She reassured me that I was gonna make it to Iceland and then we had a really nice time on the way to her homeland. She made a good impression on me and was an excellent example of Icelandic kindness and openness. In Mosfellsbær, the town she lives in, my travel mates and I had a little walk and a delicious breakfast. After this we headed south.

Mosfellsbær - breakfast at Anna Tours

Mosfellsbær – breakfast at Anna Tours

Mosfellsbær - by Reykjavik

Mosfellsbær – by Reykjavik

Kleifarvatn - lake

Kleifarvatn – lake

Kleifarvatn - lake

Kleifarvatn – lake

Kleifarvatn - lake

Kleifarvatn – lake

Kleifarvatn - lake

Kleifarvatn – lake

By the lake we found another geothermal area – Krýsuvík. This time there were no geysers, but yellow, red and green soil, fumaroles, mud pots and hot springs with sulfur odor. The smell of steam is not nice, but after some time you can get used to it. What is more, we got a fantastic view on the Atlantic Ocean from the hill.

Krýsuvík - the geothermal area

Krýsuvík – the geothermal area

Krýsuvík - the geothermal area

Krýsuvík – the geothermal area

Krýsuvík - the geothermal area

Krýsuvík – the geothermal area

Krýsuvík - the geothermal area

Krýsuvík – the geothermal area

Krýsuvík - the geothermal area

Krýsuvík – the geothermal area

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Krýsuvík

Icelandic horses are the second most common animals on the island (after sheep). You can find plenty of them when driving on the road. These horses are really friendly and they are really good at posing to photos.

Icelandic horses

Icelandic horses

Icelandic horses

Icelandic horses

Icelandic horse

Icelandic horse

On our way to the most popular spots in Iceland, we did dozens of stopovers to take the best shots of stunning landscapes.

Hlíðarvatn - Lake

Hlíðarvatn – Lake

Hlíðarvatn - Lake

Hlíðarvatn – Lake

Rainbow by the road

Rainbow by the road

Atlantic Ocean

Atlantic Ocean

Hidden people

Icelanders are known for their hospitality and peaceful attitude to life, but also for their strong belief in elves. They came up with many legends about so-called hidden people and they convey these stories to others who visit Iceland. They are serious about those little creatures and advice not to mess with them.

Photos below present the Icelandic turf houses. This is a reconstructed vikingera long house or farmstead – Þjóðveldisbærinn, which was buried under vol­canic ash in 1104 following the eruption of the volcano Hekla. It was reconstructed 40 years ago and nowadays it serves as a museum. Personally I think it is inhabited by hidden people. We got a magical view there.

Þjóðveldisbærinn – the reconstructed farm house in the Þjórsárdalur valley

Þjóðveldisbærinn – the reconstructed farm house in the Þjórsárdalur valley

Þjóðveldisbærinn – the reconstructed farm house in the Þjórsárdalur valley

Þjóðveldisbærinn – the reconstructed farm house in the Þjórsárdalur valley

Þjóðveldisbærinn – the reconstructed farm house in the Þjórsárdalur valley

Þjóðveldisbærinn – the reconstructed farm house in the Þjórsárdalur valley

Þjóðveldisbærinn – the reconstructed farm house in the Þjórsárdalur valley

Þjóðveldisbærinn – the reconstructed farm house in the Þjórsárdalur valley

Next part to be unveiled soon, so stay tuned ;)

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